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A Sacramento man, who was driving through Lake County on his way home, suffered serious injuries after a local sheriff’s deputy lost control of his police vehicle and crashed head-on into the man. The man and the county recently ended their case, with the jury ruling for the plaintiff and awarding more than $2 million in damages. If you’ve been injured in an auto accident, you need to make sure that you have a skilled California car accident lawyer on your side to ensure that you get everything you should, whether through a judgment or a settlement.

Marc, from Sacramento, was driving his Honda Accord eastbound on Highway 20 on a rainy September morning in Lake County. While traveling across Highway 20 as he headed home from a wedding, Marc found himself facing a situation no driver wants to see:  a westbound vehicle had spun out of control on the wet road, had crossed the double-yellow line, and was headed directly for him. The two vehicles collided in a head-on crash, lakeconews.com reported.

Marc suffered serious injuries in the accident. He had a shattered left wrist and shattered ankle joint, and he experienced pain in his hip and chest. Since the driver who hit Marc was an on-duty sheriff’s deputy, the injured man sued Lake County. The case went to trial. At trial, there are generally two major hurdles:  liability and damages. Clearly, each of these hurdles involves obtaining and submitting sufficient evidence to support your contentions and refute those of the other side.

An elementary school teacher’s Fair Employment and Housing Act lawsuit for disability discrimination, and the California Court of Appeal‘s ruling in it, highlight just how far an employer must go before it can say it has met its obligations under FEHA. The appellate court reversed a summary judgment in favor of the employer, ruling that the employer presented no proof that the assignment it gave the employee was a reasonable accommodation.

The dispute, which pitted elementary school teacher Lauralyn Swanson against her employer, the Morongo Unified School District, started in the fall of 2008, when Swanson sought to return to school after missing most of the previous year due to breast cancer. The school district placed the teacher in a fifth-grade classroom. The teacher requested a second-grade assignment, having recently taught second grade before her illness and because she feared her health limitations would physically prevent her from performing the tasks involved in the fifth-grade assignment.

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